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Respect for the Game - 365 Days to Better Baseball

HomeBlogsJack Perconte's blogRespect for the Game - 365 Days to Better Baseball
HomeBlogsJack Perconte's blogRespect for the Game - 365 Days to Better Baseball
Respect for the Game - 365 Days to Better Baseball

Saturday Secrets to Great Baseball Coaching

Respect for the Game begins with the Coach

 

The term "Respect the game" is a statement often used when it comes to youth baseball, but exactly what respect for the game means is elusive. It is another one of those terms as, "It's all about fun" and "Keeping sport in perspective" that sounds great but often has no real definition.

Respect for the game in youth baseball means that everyone involved from players, to coaches, fans and officials must realize there is certain etiquette (sportsmanship) that determines how all should act. With that in mind, all should treat each other with respect by never making the situation about them, instead of about the game itself. Coaches have the responsibility to act with respect, coach players what that respect means and keep parents in line when that respect has been broached.

How does one know when the Respect the Game etiquette has been broken?

The answer is pretty simple, when people leave the field talking about incidents which are not related to the baseball playing itself, then there is a problem.

Most common signs coaches do not have respect for the game

  1. Kicking or throwing objects
  2. Excessive arguing with umpires
  3. Showing up a player on the field, before or after a game
  4. Playing with a win at all cost attitude
  5. Over coaching where they bring attention to themselves and not to players

Common Signs Players have disrespected the game

  1. Wearing uniform wrong way
  2. Arguing with umps
  3. Showing up another player
  4. Lack of hustle
  5. Showing an I don't care attitude
  6. Not being a team player

Common signs parents are not showing respect for the game

  1. Arguing with umpires
  2. Showing disgust with other team or their own team
  3. Any display that brings attention to the stands during games
  4. Approaching coaches, umps or other team after games with a gripe

Good coaches have preseason meetings that discuss this lack of respect issues so they do not appear during the season hopefully.

About Jack Perconte

After playing major league baseball, Jack Perconte has taught baseball and softball since 1988 and offered valuable coaching training too. He has helped numerous youth players reach their potential, as well as having helped parents and coaches navigate their way through the challenging world of youth sports. Jack is one of the leading authorities in the areas of youth baseball training and coaching training advice.

All Jack Perconte articles are used with copyright permission.

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