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Batting Average Calculator for Baseball

HomeBlogsChris Sloan's blogBatting Average Calculator for Baseball
HomeBlogsChris Sloan's blogBatting Average Calculator for Baseball
Batting Average Calculator for Baseball

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A player's batting average is calculated by dividing his hits by all of his at-bats for a value between zero (represented as.000) and one. It is one of the most traditional and widely used metrics for gauging a hitter's effectiveness at the plate (1.000). The league-wide batting average has consistently stayed around.250 in recent years.

Although batting average is a valuable statistic for evaluating a player's at-the-plate skills, it isn't comprehensive. For instance, the amount of walks or hit-by-pitch at-bats a hitter has does not go towards batting average. Additionally, it disregards hit type (with a double, triple or home run being more valuable than a single).

Pitcher evaluation may also be done using batting average. This statistic is known as "opponents' batting average" or "batting average against," and it is calculated by dividing the total number of hits a certain pitcher has allowed by the total number of at-bats he has faced.

BAA is often used to grade pitchers, particularly when analyzing opponent handedness splits. Because right-handed batters alternate in lineups with left-handed hitters, a pitcher's ERA cannot include left-handed players. Therefore, either BAA or OPS-against are often used to analyze a pitcher's effectiveness versus batters on either side of the plate.

Batting average is also affected by the era in which a player played. In Major League Baseball, for example, the typical batting average was .260 in the 19th century and .255 in the 20th century. Batting average is also a poor indicator of power. While a hitter could have a high batting average but not hit many home runs, that doesn't mean he has no power at all. The best example of this is Ichiro Suzuki, who has averaged almost .340 over his career and led the American League in hits for 11 straight seasons from 2001-11. A batting average calculator is also a poor indicator of power. While a hitter could have a high batting average but not hit many home runs, that doesn't mean he has no power at all. The best example of this is Ichiro Suzuki, who has averaged almost .340 over his career and led the American League in hits for 11 straight seasons from 2001-11.

Origin of the Batting Average in Baseball

To evaluate a hitter's performance, the batting average was developed. Walks were also counted as hits for one season in 1887. However, after that campaign, it was decided that batting average should only take into consideration a batter's hits and not any other ways he utilized to get on base.

Batting Average Calculator

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